Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Experts Meeting on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Dubai, UAE.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Eui-Hyeok Yang

Stevens Institute of Technology, USA

Keynote: Controlled growth of graphene, carbon nanotubes and transition metal dichalcogenides

Time : 10:00 – 10:30

Conference Series Nanomaterials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Eui-Hyeok Yang photo
Biography:

Eui-Hyeok Yang is a Professor of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stevens Institute of Technology. He was a Senior Member of the Engineering Staff at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He received a number of awards, including the prestigious Lew Allen Award for Excellence at JPL in 2003 in recognition of his excellence in advancing the use of MEMS-based actuators for NASA's space applications. He is an Associate Editor and/or Editorial Board of several journals including the IEEE Sensors Journal. As Principal Investigator, he has been responsible for obtaining extremely competitive research funding from several federal agencies including NSF, AFOSR, US Army, NRO, NASA and DARPA (including 6 NSF and 3 AFOSR grants, and 5 NASA and 3 NRO contracts) with the total amount exceeding $7M.

Abstract:

My groups research is aimed at understanding some of the basic principles of smart microfluidics and 1D/2D material growth, solving problems in the implementation of these materials. I will present two different topics. First topic is our development of the low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) growth of 1D and 2D materials. We grow large-grain single crystalline or large-scale polycrystalline monolayers of MoS2, MoSe2, WSe2 and WS2 along with other transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Our unique growth method permits the growth of TMDs on the contacted areas only, enabling the chip-scale fabrication of heterostructures in arbitrary shapes without lithography. We also demonstrate an approach toward controlled CNT growth atop graphene substrates, where the reaction equilibrium between the source hydrocarbon decomposition and carbon saturation into/precipitation from the catalyst nanoparticles shifts toward CNT growth, rather than graphene consumption. Second, we demonstrate a novel in situ control of the droplet pinning on the polymer surface, enabling the control of droplet adhesion from strongly pinned to extremely slippery (and vice versa). The adhesion of organic droplets on the surfaces dramatically switches in situ (i.e., without the removal of liquid droplets), presenting a great potential for in situ manipulation and control of liquid droplets for various applications including lab-on-chip technologies, oil separation, and water treatment.

Keynote Forum

Mohammad A Qasaimeh

New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE

Keynote: Microfludics for cell analysis and isolation

Time : 10:30- 11:00

Conference Series Nanomaterials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammad A Qasaimeh photo
Biography:

Mohammad A Qasaimeh is an Assistant Professor of Engineering at New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD). He directs the Advanced Microfluidics and Microdevices Laboratory (AMMLab), and his current research interests include developing microfluidic devices for biomedical applications. Prior to joining NYUAD, he was a Postdoctoral Associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Medical School. He earned his PhD degree in Biomedical Engineering from McGill University, where he received several prestigious fellowships and awards including the NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship. His research has been published in several peer-reviewed journals including Nature Communications, PLOS Biology, and Lab on a Chip.

Abstract:

Microfluidics has emerged as a technology with significant impact on cell biology and medical research. The ability to manipulate fluids at the microscale has led to new methods to manipulate and study biological entities. During this talk, I will present microfluidic technologies for three different biological applications: (i) I will discuss our work on developing a simple microfluidic system for culturing mammalian cells and temporally-controlling the delivery of bio-reagents. We used the system to spatiotemporally control the distribution of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) within the cell-culture channel, and HeLa cells were exposed to TNF pulses as short as 8 s. With this system, we measured for the first time the shortest required duration of TNF stimulation that elicits activation of the survival pathway (NF-kB) in cancer cells. Preliminary results suggested that short pulses of TNF stimulation can provoke early cancer cell apoptosis. Next, (ii) I will introduce our work with Microfluidic Quadrupoles (MQs), which constitutes the first experimental demonstration and characterization of fluidic quadrupoles. We used the MQ to manipulate concentration gradients of chemicals and established the concept of floating gradients. We used the MQ to apply floating gradients of Interleukin-8 to cultured human neutrophils in a Petri dish, and challenged neutrophils with stationary and moving gradients. The setup allowed us to observe dynamics of neutrophils during adhesion, polarization, and migration. Finally, (iii) I will discuss our recent experiments in using the herringbone microfluidic chip to capture circulating plasma cells from blood samples taken from multiple myeloma patients.

Break: 10:00 - 10:15

Keynote Forum

Basma El Zein

Basma El Zein University of Business and Technology, Saudi Arabia

Keynote: ZnO nanostructures for quantum dots sensitized solar cells

Time : 11:20- 11:50

Conference Series Nanomaterials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Basma El Zein photo
Biography:

Basma El Zein, is the Director of Research and Consultation Center (RCC) at the University of Business and Technology (UBT), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. She was a Research Scientist at KAUST and an Associate Researcher at IEMN, Lille, France. She got her PhD from the University of Lille 1–France in Nano-Optoelectronics (Engineering) with high distinction. She is a senior member of IEEE, member of ACS, MRS, SPIE, ECS and Lebanese Engineering syndicate. She has been selected as Solar Pioneer by MESIA during WFES 2015. Her recent research interests include working on nanostructures for third generation solar cells, energy harvesting and energy storage. She is exploring new materials such as kesterite, perovskite and protein to be used as light absorber for solid state solar cells. rn

Abstract:

Nano-materials are considered as building blocks of many optoelectronic devices. They differ from bulk counterpart in the size, characteristic and their new physical properties and offer new opportunities to be employed in various applications. Zero dimensional (0D) and one Dimensional (1D) nanostructures have attracted lots of attention in solar energy harvesting, conversion and storage, owing to their unique physical and chemical properties. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires provide separation and transportation of the generated carriers by the excitation of the attached Quantum Dots (QDs). The geometry of the NWs arrays allows improved optical reflection and light trapping leading to enhancing the light absorption. Furthermore, ZnO NWs will drive and direct the transportation of the photo-generated electrons, and thus improving the energy conversion efficiency of the solar cell. In this presentation, we will discuss one dimensional nanostructure in quantum dots sensitized solar cells and the role they play in increasing the conversion efficiency of solar cells, taking in consideration the materials to be used to meet the main objective of developing an eco-green solar cell with high conversion efficiency.

Keynote Forum

Edward Yi Chang

National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan

Keynote: InAs HEMTs for high frequency and high speed applications

Time : 11:50-12:20

Conference Series Nanomaterials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Edward Yi Chang photo
Biography:

Edward Yi Chang has completed his PhD from University of Minnesota, USA. He is the VP of Research and Development and Dean of International College of Semiconductor Technology, NCTU, Taiwan. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and is an IEEE Fellow and Distinguished Lecturer.

Abstract:

Outstanding carrier transport properties of III-V compound semiconductors have shown excellent potential for high frequency characteristics. Among them, III-V HEMTs on various material systems like InGaAs/InAlAs, InAs/InP have emerged promising for millimeter wave and terahertz applications. Many previous reports of record high frequency characteristics have shown InGaAs/InAlAs HEMTs with very high cut off frequency (ft) and maximum oscillation frequency (fmax). With increase in Indium concentration higher electron mobility can be achieved which can lead to higher operating frequency. Among them, InAs HEMTs have shown high frequency record of 710 GHz for 60 nm gate length. These HEMT structures can be fabricated for high frequency applications using Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) techniques. Small gate length devices have shown excellent RF performances over past two decades. Besides, due to high electron mobility, saturation velocity and large conduction band offset in InAs, InAs-channel HEMTs are also promising for high speed and low power applications. InAs pseudomorphic HEMTs on InP substrate have been reported to have less short channel effects (SCE) through cap recess engineering and demonstrated low gate delay time when biased at 0.5V. In conclusion, InAs devices are promising for high frequency applications upto sub terahertz range and high speed low power logic application for post Si CMOS application. The outstanding performances of the device will be presented in this talk.

  • Track 2: Nanomaterials synthesis
    Track 3: Nanodevices and Systems
    Track 6: Nano Electronic Devices
    Track 8: Nanotechnology Applications
    Track 11: Applications of Nanomaterials
    Track 12: Nanotech Products
Location: Dubai
Speaker

Chair

Pavol Hvizdos

Slovak Academy of Sciences, Slovakia

Session Introduction

Abu Bakar Suriani

Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia

Title: Graphene oxide based polymer nanocomposites and their supercapacitor applications

Time : 12:30-12:50

Speaker
Biography:

Abu Bakar Suriani received her PhD from Universiti Teknologi MARA,Malaysia together with the Excellent Research Award during the convocation ceremony. Afterwards, she has received various research grants, among them are from Kurita Water and Environment Foundation, Japan, Malaysia Toray Science Foundation, Ministry of Higher Education of Malaysia and Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation of Malaysia. She was awarded the L’Oreal Malaysia for Women in Science Fellowship Award 2013. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and apart from being actively involved in research, she was also the Head of Physics Department, Faculty of Science & Mathematics, UPSI (2013-2015).

Abstract:

A new and facile one-step method to synthesise graphene oxide/natural rubber latex (GO/NRL) nanocomposite was achieved using an electrochemical exfoliation method. In this method, the fabrication of GO/NRL nanocomposite occurs concurrently with GO production that is intermixed with NRL. This approach is a simple and innovative method that succeeded in producing nanocomposite with better conductivity. The samples were characterized using FESEM, HRTEM, FT-IR, UV-vis, micro-Raman spectroscopy, XRD, TGA, I-V and C-V measurements. The C-V analysis showed that the specific capacitance of the samples prepared via the one-step method was 103.7 Fg-1, much better than those produced via a two-step method (32.6 Fg-1). These results were also consistent with the I-V analysis, in which a higher conductivity value was measured for the one-step method (7.12 x 10-5 Scm-1) than for the two-step method (3.62 x 10-7 Scm-1). In conclusion, the one-step method introduced for the fabrication of GO/NRL nanocomposite is a promising method for implementation in supercapacitor applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Azmi has completed his PhD from School of Chemistry University of Bristol United Kingdom.. He is currently Research Fellow of Nanotechnology Research Centre at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI). He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as Deputy Director International Affairs Divisition UPSI.

Abstract:

Here is presented a systematic study of the dispersibility of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in natural rubber latex (NR-latex) assisted by a series of single-, double-, and triple-sulfosuccinate anionic surfactants containing phenyl ring moieties. Optical polarising microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy have been performed to obtain the dispersion-level profiles of the MWCNTs in the nanocomposites. Interestingly, a triple-chain, phenyl-containing surfactant, namely sodium 1,5-dioxo-1,5-bis(3-phenylpropoxy)-3-((3-phenylpropoxy)carbonyl) pentane-2-sulfonate (TCPh), has a greater capacity the stabilisation of MWCNTs than a commercially available single-chain sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) surfactant. TCPh provides significant enhancements in the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites, up to ~10-2 S cm-1, as measured by a four-point probe instrument. These results have allowed compilation of a road map for the design of surfactant architectures capable of providing the homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs required for the next generation of polymer-carbon-nanotube materials, specifically those used in aerospace technology.

Speaker
Biography:

Assoc.Prof. RNDr. Richard Dvorsky, Ph.D. has completed his Ph.D in applied physics and postdoctoral studies in nanomaterial sciences from VSB – Technical University of Ostrava in Czech Republic. He is the head of Laboratory of Nanoparticulate Materials and Department of Physical Experiments, a member of Czech Physical Society and the Czech Society for New Materials and Technologies. He has published more than 32 papers in reputed journals, chapter in book (Wiley) and is the inventor of several patents in nanotechnologies.

Abstract:

For practical sorption and degradation of pollutants and hazardous substances, it is possible to advantageously apply a new hybrid nanomaterials with a high specific surface area and the photocatalytic efficiency. This work presents the preparation of effective photocatalytic core-shell nanostructures C60-TiO2-C60 by application of a new patented method of controlled sublimation. Nanoparticles of commercial photocatalytic material TiO2 (P25 Evonik) were subjected to cavitation ultrasonic deagglomeration in a liquid dispersion medium of solution of fullerene C60 in toluene. Subsequently, in a strong ultrasonic field a new method for preparing of microemulsion nanoparticle core-shell C60-TiO2-C60 was applied. Their aqueous nanodispersion was solidified by very fast freezing, which prevents the crystalline segregation of the dispersion and preserves homogeneous distribution of nanoparticles in the solid amorphous block. By controlled sublimation at the chosen temperature and pressure molecules of water were removed from the frozen dispersion. Controlling of conditions during sublimation provided suitable speed of the phase interface retreat between ice and vacuum and dispersed nanoparticles were organised under these conditions into lamellar nanoaggregates with high specific surface area. Thus prepared nanomaterial showed during degradation tests a high photocatalytic activity.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahsanulhaq Qurashi is Assistant Professor in Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology and Chemistry Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals. His research interests are Fabrication and Patterning of Zero and one- and Two dimensional Metal chalcogenide Nanostructures, Functionalization of Nanostructures, Fabrication of Micro and Nanoscale Chemical and Biosensors and Nanomaterials for Renewable Energy Applications. He has 30 publications and 3 book chapters to his credit.

Abstract:

The presentation provides insight into a broad spectrum of the state-of-the-art research activities and development that focuses on the functional metal-oxide nanostructured (MOXN) systems. This includes diverse synthetic methods that lead to form these nanostructures, heterostructure formations, their plausible synthetic mechanisms and detailed characterization. A wide range of remarkable physicochemical characteristics will be discussed, covering a number of nanostructured metal-oxides, such as ZnO, In2O3, SnO2, and TiO2, etc. Current efforts on MOXN gas sensors will be discussed. MOXN based sensors, their fabrication and current status will be the primary focus of this presentation. Also at the end, some additional efforts for energy harvesting i.e., hydrogen production will be discussed.

Chunfeng Shi

Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, China

Title: Skillful design of bifunctional titanosilicate with hierarchical nano-structure

Time : 14:40-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Chunfeng Shi completed his PhD in 2008 at Research Institute of Petroleum Processing (RIPP), SINOPEC, and then stayed as an Engineer. Now, he is Professor and the Director of Nanomaterials Research Group at the long term research department in RIPP. His main research field is nanomaterials with catalytic oxidation function. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has applied for more than 100 patents in catalysis field.

Abstract:

One pot process (involving in situ H2O2 production with simultaneous conversion to organic oxides in the same reactor without refining), is being regarded as more promising technology to the environmental benign production of organic oxides, for its good potentials for ulterior savings in capital and production costs. In this direct oxidation technology, the catalysts used are bi-functional and mostly consist of precious-metal and titanosilicate. At present, the key issue of the above process is to design new catalysts for improving the synthesis efficiency. One of our aims is to design and prepare this nano bi-functional catalyst with intra-particle voids. In this abstract, our own work on bi-functional catalysts especially for their skillful design and characterization will be summarized and introduced concisely, especially our recent advance in developing titanosilicate with intra-particle voids. In particular, recently, we have synthesized a titanosilicate with intra-particle voids being applied in one pot process, which has been prepared by semi-in-situ synthetic method, which involves the addition of precious metal sources and organic-alkaline to reaction mixture under hydrothermal conditions. The synthetic process results in the combination of nano precious metal particles with titanosilicate framework, and redistribution of active Ti species throughout the crystals, thereby enriching the surface of hollow crystals with catalytic species. Besides easily separated and recycled, the bifunctional catalyst may be a feasible application in industries in the near future. At this meeting, we will briefly summarize our own work on this new type of nano titanium silicalite with precious-metal being combined and hollow structure, especially for their characteristic and catalytic performance, as well as our recent advances in developing the bi-functional titanosilicate with intra-particle voids.

Avinash Baji

Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore

Title: Bioinspired hierarchical structures obtained using electrospinning enabled techniques

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Avinash Baji has completed his PhD from the University of Akron (Akron, Ohio) and Postdoctoral studies from the University of Sydney. He joined SUTD as an Assistant Professor in 2013. His current research interests include fabrication of electrospun fibers for bio-duplication of dry-adhesion mechanism of natural fibrillar structures. He has authored over 30 journal articles, with additional papers in conference proceedings. Some of these research papers are highly cited with three recent publications specially featured in (i) Lab Talk, nanotechweb.org; (ii) the Top 25 Hottest Articles by Composite Science and Technology (CST); and (iii) List of Most Downloaded CST Articles.

Abstract:

Natural materials and composites display superior mechanical properties compared to its constituent materials. For example, bones and shells although composed of brittle minerals and soft proteins display high toughness and strength. This is attributed to the organization and structuring of their constituent materials within the composite. Mimicking the size, geometry and the structural design of natural materials can be useful to design and develop new class of synthetic materials. Recently, researchers have used electrospinning to fabricate bio-inspired materials that have found applications in wide variety of fields. For instance, electrospinning is used to fabricate fibers with controllable composition and arrangement such that they closely mimic the natural hierarchical structures for development of functional fibers and membranes that display special wettability. In this study, we used electrospinning to fabricate hierarchical fibrous structures for dry-adhesive applications. These fibers mimic the dry-adhesive mechanisms prevalent in nature, which enables certain animals and insects to scale vertical walls. Briefly, the fibers are electrospun on the surface of a porous anodized aluminum oxide template (AAO). The AAO template with the fibers is then heated above the glass transition temperature of the polymer. This enables the polymer to flow into the pores of the AAO resulting in the formation of sub-nano structures on the surface of the fibers. These hierarchical structures closely mimic the ‘hairy’ structures found on the feet of certain animals. We then investigate the shear and normal adhesion performance of these samples using a tensile tester and atomic force microscope (AFM). The normal and shear adhesion results reveal that these samples adhere to various surfaces including glass and metals. The durability of the adhesive was also verified by repeating AFM adhesion measurements over 1000 consecutive cycles. The normal pull-off force was seen to be constant over 1000 attachment-detachment cycles. These results show the potential of using these electrospun fibers for dry-adhesive applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Ali Al-Radhi has completed his Bachelor in Mechanical Engineering from Australian College of Kuwait (ACK). He has completed an internship at Kuwaiti Institution of Scientific Research (KISR). He workes on nano coating for enhancing buildings energy efficiency.

Abstract:

The contribution from buildings towards energy consumption has steadily increased reaching figures between 20% and 40% in developed countries for both commercial and residential buildings. In countries with hot climate such as Kuwait, the major elements that causes such increase in energy consumption is the air conditioning system along with the type of glazing used for buildings. This is because the inner temperature increases from infrared heat radiation passing through the windows. For this reason, coating the window using nano technology would help in managing heat generated from radiations. In this work, a study was conducted experimentally on a 6x6x6mm double glaze window using a 500W heat source to determine the technical feasibility of applying single layer commercial nano coating, multi layer commercial nano coating, and commercial 30% shaded film. The results showed that applying a single layer of nano coating material reduced the overall heat transfer by roughly 7°C while with multi layer case; the heat transfer reduction was only 1.5°C less than the single layer scenario. The 30% shaded film has shown poor result, as it reduced only 1°C compared with the original sample. The final temperatures for the original sample, single layer nano coating, multi layer nano coating, and 30% shaded film are 40, 33.235, 31.535, and 38.644°C respectively.

Davoud Dastan

Savitribai Phule Pune University, India

Title: Electrical study of organic field effect transistors grown on flexible substrates

Time : 15:40-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Davoud Dastan has completed his MSc from Savitribai Phule Pune University and is currently a PhD student in the same University. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and also participated in more than 30 international conferences.

Abstract:

Organic field effect transistors (FET) have been prepared on flexible substrates. A gate dielectric layer consists of organic and inorganic composite materials have been used for the enhancement of electrical characteristics of the FET. Nano-particulates titania were embedded into poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) and ammonium dichromate. The cross-linking of PVA with ammonium dichromate (PVA-ad) was performed with the exposure of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The solution of PVAad+TiO2 was spun onto rigid substrates. The gold contacts were made using thermal evaporation on top of the samples. In order to measure the electrical features of FET’s, an active layer of copper phthalo-cyanine (CuPc6) was deposited andthe output characteristics of the devices were investigated using semiconductor parameter analyzer. The surface morphology of the prepared FET’s was studied by means of Atomic Force Microscopic (AFM).The output characteristics results of devices exposed to UV light revealed higher mobility, on/off ratio, and threshold voltage with respect to the pristine samples.Moreover, devices with PVAad+TiO2 as gate dielectric exhibited better electrical performance compared to those with PVA-ad as gate dielectric. The AFM images illustrated higher surface roughness for irradiated devices. Additionally, granular and uniform morphology with grain sizes in the range of 20-50 nm were observed for FET devices.

Tariq Aqeel

Public Authority of Applied Education and Training, Kuwait

Title: Crystallite Mesoporous Tin Dioxide doped with Nano gold

Time : 16:15-16:35

Speaker
Biography:

Tariq Aqeel is a member of the Royal Chemical Society ( MRCS UK) has completed his MSc at Exeter University and PhD from University College London (2004-2008 UK) and became an assistant professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the Public Authority of Applied Education and Training (PAAET Kuwait). His research interests are in synthesizing mesoprous inorganic materials, nanoclusters and nanoparticles, study their optical, sensing and sorption properties. He has published 2 papers so far.

Abstract:

We report the synthesis of crystallite mesoporous tin dioxide framework that contains nano gold clusters confirmed and analyzed by BET, XRD, HRTEM, XPS and UV-visible. The material has a surface area of 97 m2g-1, average pore sizes of 2.7 nm and pore volume of 0.08 cm3g-1. We believe that initially the nano gold clusters occupy the pores of the mesoporous tin dioxide, which restricted their further growth, then some of which diffused to the walls during the heat treatment. The average nano gold clusters are 1.2 nm. The material has a band gap of 2.9 eV that been determined using KubelKa- Munk function. This material would be used for gas sensing and/or optical catalysis.

Reza Sadr

Texas A&M University, Qatar

Title: Nanofluids-its applications and prospects
Speaker
Biography:

Reza Sadr is associate professor in the mechanical engineering program at Texas A&M University Qatar. His research expertise is in experimental methods in thermo-fluid sciences with focus on advanced energy efficient systems. He received his PhD from University of Utah in 2002. Before joining Texas A&M in 2008, he moved to Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, as research scientist, and then to Georgia Tech Savannah as visiting assistant professor. His current research addresses microfluidics, droplets and sprays, environmental fluid mechanics, and supercritical thermo-fluids. He is a member of American Society of Mechanical Engineering and American Physical Society since 1998.

Abstract:

Colloidal suspensions of nano-sized particles (less than 100nm) dispersed in a fluid, commonly called nanofluids, have shown potentials as industrial fluids due to their enhanced thermo-physical and chemical characteristics. In spite of numerous reports on the anomalous enhancement in thermos-physical properties of nanofluids, there is still no solid theoretical explanation for such enhancements. Present work details various research works conducted at Texas A&M at Qatar, ranging from fundamental at nano-scale to large-scale applications of nanofluids, to better understand these phenomenon. Brownian motion of the particles in the fluid and its effect on the flow field is first discussed. Measurements of the physical and optical properties of nanofluids, such as viscosity, surface tension, refractive index, and optical transmittivity are then reported for suspensions with varying particle concentrations. Results of heat transfer experiments for nanofluids in a microchannel and for a scaled-down industrial heat exchanger is then reported. The results show no anomalous heat transfer enhancements, only marginal enhancement in heat transfer that is in agreement with effective medium theory. Further, experiments to study near-wall velocity at nanoscale are then discussed. Results of these experiments help better understanding of the reported viscosity enhancement for these fluids. Possibility of using nanofluids as drilling fluids, at pressures up to 100 MPa, is also discussed. Finally measurement campaign to investigate spray characteristics for suspensions of nanoparticles in Jet A-1 and an alternative Gas-to liquid (GTL) jet fuels are reported.

  • Poster Presentations

Chair

Wolfgang Ensinger

Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany

Session Introduction

Yeojoon Yoon

Korea Electronics Technology Institute, South Korea

Title: Large-area single layer exfoliation of Graphene oxide via Couette-Taylor flow reactor
Speaker
Biography:

Yeojoon Yoon has completed his PhD from Yonsei University and Postdoctoral studies from Korea Electronics Technology Institute. He is working on the application of graphene-based materials to water treatment technologies such as adsorption, catalytic oxidation, and membrane process. He has published more than 20 papers in SCI journals.

Abstract:

Larger graphene sheets can reduce the contact resistance caused by the number of graphene-graphene contacts and enhance the electrical conductivity. Furthermore, larger graphene sheets can be more effective in load transfer while graphene is used as a reinforcement filler in composites. Previous studies, graphite oxide synthesized by the conventional Hummers’ method was exfoliated through sonication process for obtain single layer graphene oxide. However, its lateral size was less than 10um. Additional omnidirectional mechanical energy input, such as sonication, reduces the lateral size of graphene oxide sheets. This lateral size reduction of single layer graphene oxide attribute to the further weakening of graphene sheets resulting from the hydroxyl and epoxy sites functionalized edge and plane of graphene sheets. Here, we describe a facile method to prepare large-area single layer graphene oxide, which uses the exfoliation of graphite oxide in a Couette-Taylor flow reactor. We found that the formation of Taylor vortex flow with shearing stress in the reactor is effective for exfoliation of graphite oxide, which allows for the production of a more than 100μm in lateral size single or few-layer graphene oxide platelets at a high yield of 90% within 60 min of reaction time. The properties of fabricated graphene oxide was examined by field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectra, atomic force microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscope and x-ray diffraction.

Speaker
Biography:

Su Yeon Choi received her PhD degree in 2015 at INHA University and joined the Korea Electronics Technology Institute as a Postdoctoral fellow. Her thesis focused on the self-assembled nanostructure of conducting polymers in thin films and solution state. Her current research focuses on the development of graphene-based nanocomposites for various applications such as sensor, photocatalyst and supercapacitor.

Abstract:

We report a simple but strong method to enhance sensitivity and responsibility of graphene oxide (GO) by forming a self-corrugated surface of GO. The self-corrugated surface was formed by the reaction of graphene oxide with Gallium oxide. The surface of GO is more corrugated with the concentration of Gallium oxide during the dry process of GO solution. The GO structure was distorted due to the three hydroxyl groups of Gallium oxide to replace the existing GO structure. The properties of synthesized GO was investigated by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and atomic force microscope, respectively. This GO composite have superior advantages over normal Gallium oxide for a higher organic removal property and responsibility for water treatment.