Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Experts Meeting on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Dubai, UAE.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Masamichi Yoshimura

Toyota Technological Institute, Japan

Keynote: Controlled growth of carbon nano-tube forest and graphene by chemical vapor deposition

Time : 10:00 - 10:30

Conference Series Nanomaterials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Masamichi Yoshimura photo
Biography:

Masamichi Yoshimura is the Professor and group leader of Surface Science laboratory at Toyota Technological Institute Nagoya Japan. He is the fellow of Surface Science Society of Japan. He has done pioneering research in the field of scanning probe microscopy high tech carbon materials. He has published over 200 papers in the international journals and delivered numerous invited and keynote lectures. He has BS, MS and PhD in Applied Physics and all from University of Tokyo Japan. He was a visiting scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Abstract:

Because of the excellent physical properties, carbon nano-tube (CNT) and graphene are highly expected as future functional devices in opto-electronics, nano-mechanics, etc. Here we demonstrate the controlled growth of vertically aligned CNTs (referred to as "CNT forest") and graphene. For the former growth, we used alcohol chemical vapor deposition (ACCVD) on SiO2/Si substrates. We found that the structure of CNT forests varies with catalyst thickness, where the topmost surface is capped with graphite layers when the catalyst layers are enough thick. The difference in growth behavior between Fe and Co catalysts is also presented. The growth mechanism of CNT forests are in detail investigated using SEM and Raman spectroscopy. As for graphene growth, we successfully produce a large-size single domain around 2.5 mm in diameter by reduction in the number of nucleus and enhancement of carbon diffusion. The CVD growth is done on Cu substrates using methane as a source gas. High pressure annealing is found to be effective to make the Cu surface clean and flat with step-and-terrace structure. In addition, air introduction during the growth plays a role in enhancement of diffusion of active carbons.

Break: 10:15 - 10:30 Group Photo: 10:30 - 10:35

Keynote Forum

Wolfgang Ensinger

Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany

Keynote: iNAPO - Ion conducting nanopores in polymer foils as (bio)chemical sensors

Time : 10:30 - 11:00

Conference Series Nanomaterials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wolfgang Ensinger photo
Biography:

Wolfgang Ensinger studied Chemistry and Physics at the Universities in Karlsruhe and Heidelberg in Germany. He received his PhD in 1988 from Heidelberg University. Thereafter, he was a Guest Researcher at Osaka National Research Institute in Japan, Lecturer at Institute of Solid State Physics at University Augsburg and Professor of Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry at University of Marburg. Since 2004, he is a Full Professor of Material Analysis at Technical University of Darmstadt in Germany. His research topics include formation of thin films and nanostructures, including nanochannels, nanowires and nanotubes. He has authored/co-authored more than 250 peer-reviewed scientific publications.

Abstract:

The iNAPO-project is run by a group of materials scientists, biologists, chemists, physicists and electrical engineers. The purpose is the development of biomimetic (bio)molecular sensors based on ion conducting nanopores in polymer foils. The basic principles of fabrication and working mechanism of these nanosensors is described. PET foils are irradiated with a highly energetic single ion of a heavy element at the particle accelerator at GSI Helmholtz-Center in Darmstadt. The ion damage zone in the polymer is chemically etched into a conical pore, with the small aperture being in the nm range. The nanopore walls are functionalized with a biorecognition unit, i.e., a molecule which specifically reacts with a molecule to be analyzed. In an electrochemical cell, the foil acts as separation membrane. The electrolyte current flowing through it is measured as a function of the applied potential. In the presence of specific analyte molecules, which bioconjugate with the biorecognition unit, these ionic currents are changed. Thus, a highly sensitive nanosensor is available. The preparation and working principle of the nanosensor is described. As an example, results on protein sensing shown. The concept of the functionalized ion conducting nanopores can be applied to a large number of biorecognition couples. Within the project iNAPO, the potential of this technique will be further explored. In a step further, it is planned to embed protein-based nanopores with even better selectivity into polymer membranes. Eventually, the membranes will be incorporated in electronic micro sensing devices thus creating a new type of (bio)molecular sensors

Keynote Forum

Biplab Paul

Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Sweden

Keynote: Tailoring electronic and phononic properties at nanoscale for higher thermoelectric efficiency

Time : 11:00-11:30

Conference Series Nanomaterials 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Biplab Paul photo
Biography:

Dr. Biplab Paul got his Ph. D. in 2011 from Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, India, where he initiated a new line of research in the area of thermoelectric. In 2011 Dr. Paul joined Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain, where he led another research line in the area of thermal rectification for practica realization of thermal diode. Presently, Dr. Paul is working in Linköping University, Sweden since 2012. His extensive studies in Linköping University has created a new research line in the area of flexible thermoelectric

Abstract:

The current research scenario for alternative energy sources is primarily focused on the reduction of dependency on fossil fuels, so that the harmful effects of greenhouse gases can be minimized. Thermoelectricity can contribute to this area of research by waste heat utilization for electric power generation and thus the reduction in CO2 emission. The efficiency of a thermoelectric material is defined by a dimensionless parameter thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = S2 T/, where, T,  and  are the absolute temperature, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity, respectively, and S is the Seebeck coefficient or thermopower, which is defined as V/T, i.e., the voltage that develops across a sample with a temperature gradient of 1 K. High ZT requires an unusual type of material: a good electrical conductor with high thermopower, but low thermal conductivity, i.e. it must scatter phonons (to minimize lattice contribution to thermal conductivity) without troubling the transport of charge carriers, i.e., ceramic and metallic behaviors are combined to a single material system! Due to the strong interdependency of the parameters S,  and  the reduction of thermal conductivity without deteriorating electrical conductivity is a challenging task. Structuring material systems to the nano-dimension scale can facilitate the tailoring of phononic transport independently or quasi –independently of electronic transport and thus the manifold enhancement of ZT. The focus of the present talk is to discuss the different approaches for tailoring electronic and phononic properties in nanostructured materials at different length-scales leading to the enhancement of ZT.

  • Track 1: Nanomaterials Characterization Track 4: Advances in Nanomaterials Track 5: Properties of Nanomaterials Track 7: Nanotechnology for Energy and Environment Track 9: Scope of Nanomaterials Track 10: Lignocellulosic Biomass

Session Introduction

Ranjith Rajasekharan Unnithan

The University of Melbourne, Australia

Title: Plasmonic colour filters for CMOS image sensors

Time : 12:00 – 12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Ranjith R Unnithan is Lecturer of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at The University of Melbourne. Ranjith finished his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Cambridge in 2011. After finishing his PhD, he worked as a postdoctoral researcher and project manager in the Electrical Engineering Department at Cambridge for a Samsung project. He joined at the University of Melbourne as a lecturer in 2014. He is recipient of a number of awards; including CambridgeSens innovation awards both in 2009 and 2010 and two awards from Cambridge University Entrepreneurs in 2011 which is reported in Cambridge Elevator news as ‘25 Cambridge technologies that could change the world’.

Abstract:

Conventional colour filters in CMOS image sensors are made of dyes or pigments and exploit their particular absorption properties to produce different colours. Plasmonic colour filters are superior to conventional colour filters made of dyes and pigments, especially when the pixel size is reduced to a few microns in size. This is because the dyes or pigments based filters cannot be made much thinner than several hundred nanometres due to their low absorption coefficients as well as due to fabrication of each of the three dye filters for RGB colour schemes demands complex lithographic processes. In addition to these, dyes and pigments based filters are prone to colour cross talk at submicron scale. Colour filters based on plasmonic filters can overcome the above difficulties. Also, the plasmonic filters integrated w i t h CMOS image sensors are environmentally friendly compared to their toxic counterparts. Here, we present plasmonic colour filters design based on localised surface plasmon resonances in aluminium nanodisks that are angle insensitive, polarization insensitive, inexpensive, compatible with existing CMOS technology and have high transmission coefficients.

Speaker
Biography:

Rahul Sahay graduated with a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from National University of Singapore, Singapore (2013) and also worked as Research Associate at School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, (2010–2012). After completion of his PhD degree, he was appointed as Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering Department at Amity University, Haryana, India (2013–2014). He is currently a Research Fellow at EPD, Singapore University of Technology, and Design, Singapore (since 2014). His current research interests include fabrication of nanomaterials for reusable adhesive applications, and development of nanofibrous 3D printer for fabricating flexible electronics.

Abstract:

Biomimetic poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hierarchical structures were fabricated using electrospinning combined with template wetting method for dry-adhesive applications. In the first step, electrospinning was used to produce micron sized PVDF fibers. Following this step, the fibers were placed on porous anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template. The setup was heated above the glass transition temperature of PVDF to enable the flow of PVDF within the porous channels and to grow nanometer sized pillars on the surface of electrospun fibers. The morphology of the fabricated hierarchical electrospun fibers was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adhesion performance of the samples was investigated using nanoindenter. A flat circular indenter tip (diameter=10 µm) was used to indent the samples and then retracted back to measure the pull-off force between the indenter tip and the samples. The adhesion performance of both neat PVDF fibers and hierarchical PVDF structure were investigated. The hierarchical PVDF structure exhibit increased pull-off force compared to neat PVDF control samples due to its improved van der Waals interactions with the indenter tip. The effect of penetration depth of indenter tip on the pull-off force was also investigated. The achieved experimental results indicate that these biomimetic adhesive structures can potentially be used as reusable adhesives for wide variety of applications.

Mary M Eshaghian-Wilner

University of Southern California, USA

Title: Status and modeling of nanomedicine

Time : 12:40 - 13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian-Wilner is an interdisciplinary scientist and patent attorney. She is currently a Professor of Engineering Practice at the Electrical Engineering Department of USC. She is best known for her work in the areas of optical computing, heterogeneous computing and nanocomputing. Her current research involves the applications and implications of these and other emerging technologies in medicine and law. He has founded and/or chaired numerous IEEE conferences and organizations and serves on the Editorial Board of several journals. She is the recipient of several prestigious awards and has authored and/or edited hundreds of publications, including three books.

Abstract:

Continuing development in the field of nanomedicine—and in particular, nanorobotics—promises new medical solutions through the direct treatment of cells. While much of the work being done in nanorobotics remains theoretical, the creation of a multifunctional, medicinal nanorobot capable of diagnosing and treating diseases such as cancer appears feasible. Nanorobots are especially exciting because their scale gives them certain advantages not available to larger robots. These advantages have the potential to vastly improve therapies. For example, nanorobots’ ability to target and treat a single tissue area or cell could make therapies perform more efficiently and cause fewer side effects. Experimentation is currently being done on organic, inorganic and hybrid nanorobots, with inorganic nanorobots thought to be the most likely to succeed in performing the complex, precise tasks required of medical nanorobots. Biocompatibility is an important requirement for nanorobots and will present challenges for researchers in the coming years. Without the ability to physically produce robots on the nanoscale, researchers can use computer modeling to determine how various components will function once introduced into the body. Our research team at the University of Southern California has developed a system that models nanoscale drug delivery through the bloodstream. As interest in nanomedicine and nanotechnology builds, research institutions around the world are receiving increasing amounts of funding to explore and innovate in these areas.

Speaker
Biography:

J P Singh has completed his PhD from Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi and Post-doctoral studies from Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY. He is currently an Associate Professor at IIT Delhi, India. He has published more than 75 papers in reputed journals and won many national and international awards.

Abstract:

Here, a simple, fast and effective approach for controlled reversible wettability switching of ZnO nano-wires (NWs) from super-hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic state is demonstrate. ZnO NWs were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The as-synthesized ZnO NWs are super-hydrophilic in nature with contact angle (CA) value of 0º. The as-synthesized ZnO NWs were annealed in H2 gas (50sccm) atmosphere for 1.5 hour at 300°C. After H2 gas annealing treatment, the sample becomes super-hydrophobic with CA value of 153.5°. On the other hand, if the super-hydrophobic ZnO NWs were annealed in O2 gas (50sccm) atmosphere for 1 hour at 300°C the sample becomes super-hydrophilic. Figure 1 shows the reversible wettability switching of ZnO NWs with alternative H2 and O2 gas annealing treatment. The results indicate that the ZnO NWs surface with rare oxygen vacancy defects is more favorable for water wetting. The super-hydrophobic ZnO NWs coating can be utilized to prepare super-hydrophobic transparent substrate with more than 70% transparency.

Break: 12:50 - 13:20

Chii-Chang Chen

National Central University, Taiwan

Title: Polymer disperse liquid crystal display using metallic doping nanospheres

Time : 13:50 - 14:10

Speaker
Biography:

Chii-Chang Chen received his Ph. D. degree in Sciences for Engineer from Université de Franche-Comté (Besançon, France) in 1998. His dissertation work dealt with modification of polarization-independent modulators in LiNbO3 by laser ablation. In 1998, he worked in Laboratoire dOptique P.M. Duffieux of Besancon to study high-speed LiNbO3 modulators. He joined Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena(Germany) as a visiting researcher in 2005 for 3 months and in 2007 for half month. Since 2005, he becomes associate professor in IOS-NCU. He joined Université Paris 13 (France) as a visiting researcher in 2006, 2007 and 2011 for 1 month, respectively. He received the NSC Wu Ta-You memorial award in 2006 and NCU excellent research award from 2006 to 2009, respectively. In 2008, he received Ritek young optical engineering award from Taiwan Optical Engineering Society. Since 2009, he becomes professor. He became distinguished professor of NCU since 2010. His current research interests are photonic crystals, nano-optics in LEDs and solar cells, micro-optics, passive components for WDM fiber- optic communications and bio-sensors

Abstract:

Polymer disperse liquid crystal (PDLC), which works by changing the refractive index matching and mismatching between the injected liquid and glass. The light cannot pass through the PDLC film by the index mismatching when the applied voltage turn off, called off state of the PDLC. Otherwise, if there is the electric field applied, the liquid crystals (LC) inside the PDLC droplet will be rotated to parallel arrangement. Than light will directly pass through the film by index match, called on state type. Due to these important properties LC/polymer mixture recently are studies for a wide variety of application, especially most popular in the display and smart window devices. In this work, we developed a novel polymer disperse liquid crystal (PDLC) display using heat curing method. In this article doped with small amount of (about 5 wt%) 3m-diameter silver nanospheres into PDLC. The silver nanospheres can construct the partial electric field between each other in the electric field applied. Therefore these partial electric field can decrease the operating voltage to 40V and also have high contrast and on state transmittance about 73%.

Clare Hoskins

Keele University, UK

Title: Temperature controlled theranostics for pancreatic cancer

Time : 14:10 - 14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Clare was appointed Lecturer in Pharmaceutics at Keele University in 2011. She completed her PhD at the Robert Gordon University, followed by a Postdoc at the University of Dundee. Clare’s group is interested in the fabrication of novel image guided drug delivery systems. Clare is a member of the RSC, UKICRS, British Nanomedicine Association and CRS and is a Committee Member of the CRS Preclinical Sciences and Animal Health Committee and is the Secretary of the RSC Chemical Nanosciences Division. Clare has published more than 20 papers and serves as an editorial board member for the Journal of Nanomedicine Research.

Abstract:

Pancreatic cancer is the 4th most aggressive cancer in the western world with less than 34% of patients surviving past 5 years. Lack of specific symptoms results in delayed diagnosis. Theranostics are new platforms, which offer simultaneous diagnosis and therapy resulting in a decrease in treatment time. Here treatments are conugated onto diagnostics by stimuli responsive binding allowing for controlled drug release resulting in a rapid and localised clinical effect. Hybrid nanoparticles are composed of an iron oxide core surrounded by a rigid gold shell. These particles undergo manipulation due to inherent magnetism of the core whilst laser irradiation of their gold shell results in localised heating due to surface plasmon resonance. Hence, they can be utlilised as diagnostics using MRI and laser irradiation can be used as a trigger for drug release. In our studies, we designed hybrid nanoparticles (50 nm) capable of drug loading onto their surface (3:1:0.25, Drug:Fe:Au). By exploiting the gold surface-to-drug interaction of a range of novel Bisnaphtalamido based agents a system with heat triggered drug release was produced. In vitro studies of these formulations on human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines (BxPC-3 & Panc-1) showed the novel formulations possess a 10-fold lower IC50 value when compared with the free drug after only 24 h. These cytotoxicity studies combined with cellular uptake studies showed the formulations to be significantly more effective compared with gemcitabine. In vivo trials have commenced to further elucidate their viability for use as theranostics in pancreatic cancer therapy.

Speaker
Biography:

Tanuja Mohanty had received her PhD degree from Utkal University, India in 1999 and did her Post-doctoral work at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. Since 2006, she is working as faculty in Physics in School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. She has published nearly 50 research papers in International Journals of repute and has addressed many International Conferences. For over a decade, she has been working in the field of smart nanomaterials.

Abstract:

Graphene is a 2D carbon network exhibiting zero band gap thus limiting its application in nanoelectronics and energy materials. Nitrogen doping of graphene has been found to be a suitable route to open the band gap and tune the electronic structure of graphene for its application in lithium batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors. Substitutional doping by chemical route although has become in practice, yet lacks a systematic control over dopant concentration. On the other hand, insertion of nitrogen atoms into graphene by nitrogen ion implantation at low energy (few eV to keV) range is much more fruitful in controlling the dopant concentration and dopant distribution by allowing uniform incorporation of dopants through production of point and extended defects. Variation of ion beam energy and fluence results in different doping levels giving rise to different branching ratio between pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen. This results in systematic variation in intensity ratio of D and G and 2D peaks of Raman spectra of graphene. Ion bombardment induced carbon loss leads to formation of various kinds of defects in the graphene lattice where the nitrogen atoms are able to insert and bond to neighbouring carbon atoms. The loss of carbon atoms are estimated from SRIM-2013 (stopping of ion in matter) simulation programme. Scanning Kelvin probe measurement reveals that N-ion implantation leads to a shift in the Fermi level of pristine graphene in a controlled manner. The areal density of N-implantation induced electron doping quantified from the integral of the Fermi level shift is correlated with the observed variation in Raman spectra with fluence.

Speaker
Biography:

Anthony completed his PhD from Manchester University and postdoctoral studies from Boston College, Massachussetts. He joined Keele University in 1993 and is currently Senior Lecturer in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry in the School of Pharmacy. He carries out his research into synthetic chemistry and drug discovery and delivery as part of Keele Nanopharmaceutics Research Group. Anthony is a Fellow of a the Royal Society of Chemistry, and member of the American Chemical Society and the United Kingdom and Ireland Controlled Release Society.

Abstract:

Calix[4]resorcinarenes (CXRs) are cyclic oligomers commonly used as starting materials or building blocks in the design of supramolecular systems but a recent review has detailed their potential for drug delivery. They have well-defined upper and lower rims and possess a central hydrophobic cavity for host guest interaction with organic molecules. CXRs enhance the solubility of hydrophobic drugs via hydrophobic interaction. However, studies have suggested that the defined interior of the calixarene structure is only suitable to solubilise drugs of a certain architecture. This work focussed on the solubilisation potential of a sulfonated CXR using propofol as a model hydrophobic drug. Propofol is a commonly used short acting anaesthetic agent currently formulated as an oil in water emulsion due to its poor aqueous solubility. This viscous solution often proves painful to patients resulting in the need for pain relief . In this study a sulfonated CXR derived from octanal was fabricated and characterised by 1H NMR and FTIR. The CXRs formed were 92 nm at low concentration (0.01 mgmL-1), however at increased concentration (5 mgmL-1) the size increased to 363 nm. The drug loading studies showed an increase in propofol solubilisation up to 9 mgmL-1, which, when combined with the particle size measurements suggests that supramolecular species are formed in which drug molecules are surrounded by the CXRs rather than an individual drug molecule being hosted within the hydrophobic cavity of the CXR. This study highlights the potential of sulfonated CXRs as drug solubilising agents.

Speaker
Biography:

Pavol Hvizdoš has completed his PhD in Material Sciences from Technical University, Košice, Slovakia. He has been working at the Institute of Materials Research since 1988 and as Director since 2014. He spent as Marie Curie Fellow for two years at Queen Mary University, London, UK. Later, he worked for five years as Ramon y Cajal Fellow at Polytechnic University of Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals with more than 370 citations.

Abstract:

A range of complex composites based on SiC matrix with conductive additives such as TiNbC and carbon nanotubes of various volume fractions was prepared. The microstructure and chemical composition were studied by SEM equipped with EDX analyzer. Mechanical properties such as hardness and fracture toughness of prepared composite materials were evaluated by means of Vickers indentation. Propagation of indentation cracks was analyzed using light microscopy and SEM. Nanohardness and elasticity of individual constituent phases were determined by instrumented nanoindentation. Wear and its mechanisms were studied by means of tribological testing in pin-on-disc configuration and wear resistance. Additionally, the electric conductivity as function of volume fraction and distribution of the condutive additives was determined and percolation limits established. Machinability of the prepared materials by electric discharge technique was tested and material removal mechanisms determined.

Yeojoon Yoon

Korea Electronics Technology Institute, South Korea

Title: Facile synthesis of graphene-based materials and their applications for water treatment

Time : 15:45 - 16:05

Speaker
Biography:

Yeojoon Yoon has completed his PhD from Yonsei University and Postdoctoral studies from Korea Electronics Technology Institute. He is working on the application of graphene-based materials to water treatment technologies such as adsorption, catalytic oxidation, and membrane process. He has published more than 20 papers in SCI journals.

Abstract:

Since graphene, a new generation of nano-carbon material, was discovered, it has received attention in diverse fields including environmental applications. Here, we report a facile method to prepare graphene-based materials using a Couette-Taylor flow reactor. Furthermore, this study investigates possible water treatment applications using graphene-based materials. Several representative physiochemical water treatment technologies such as adsorption, catalytic oxidation, and membrane process were used for evaluation. In the adsorption evaluation, an experiment was conducted in which As(III) and As(V) were removed by synthesizing magnetite (Fe3O4) with graphene. The synthesized Fe3O4-graphene oxide exhibited better arsenic adsorption capacity compared to reduced graphene oxide produced with Fe3O4 synthesis because the functional groups on the graphene oxide (GO) surface facilitate greater synthesis of Fe3O4. Non-oxidative graphene (nOG), which enables mass production at a lower cost and in a shorter time compared to the previous two graphene-based materials (GO and rGO), had a higher arsenic adsorption removal rate in case of using the synthesized Fe3O4-nOG than the other reported Fe3O4 synthesis absorbents. Among graphene-based materials tested in catalytic ozonation, GO had the highest hydroxyl radical generation rate. However, nOG had a significantly higher ratio of generated hydroxyl radicals to consumed ozone. Additionally, in the case of nOG, hydroxyl radicals existed with an even ratio of graphene surface and bulk solution. In the membrane process using graphene-based materials, the GO-blended membrane, which has hydrophilicity due to its surface functional group, performed the best, while the polysulfone membrane had larger pores and higher permeability than the polyvinylidene fluoride membrane.

Speaker
Biography:

Su Yeon Choi received her PhD degree in 2015 at INHA University and joined the Korea Electronics Technology Institute as a Postdoctoral fellow. Her thesis focused on the self-assembled nanostructure of conducting polymers in thin films and solution state. Her current research focuses on the development of graphene-based nanocomposites for various applications such as sensor, photocatalyst and supercapacitor.

Abstract:

Described herein is a flexible and lightweight sensor made of a thin film composed of graphene nanoplatelet (GNP), which was printed onto flexible plastic (poly-ethylene terephthalate, PET) surfaces by using inkjet techniques. The flexible film sensor could selectively detect environmental hazardous chemicals such as acids (hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, nitric acid, and hydrochloric acid) and petroleum (gasoline, diesel, and kerosene). Graphene, as a next generation electronic material, which is also the basic structure of all graphitic materials, is a one-atom-thick planar sheet of sp2 bonded carbon atoms in a honeycomb crystal lattice. GNP exhibits excellent electron transfer promoting ability for some species and excellent catalytic behavior toward small bio/molecules, which makes GNP extremely attractive for electrochemical sensors. The film sensor based on GNP take advantages of the increased electrode surface area, mass-transport rate and fast electron transfer compared to sensors based on bulk materials between other factors. However, the main challenge of how to improve the selectivity of the film sensors to the hazardous chemicals remains. In order to meet this requirement, the inducing of appropriate polymers, resins, and metal ions-specific functional groups onto the film with the desired properties was performed in this study.

Break: 12:50 - 13:20
  • Young Researchers Forum

Session Introduction

Seba Sara Varghese

The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Title: Ab initio study of H2S adsorption on graphene doped with P and S

Time : 16:25 – 16:40

Biography:

Seba Sara Varghese received her Master’s degree (M. E) in Microelectronics from Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani in 2012. She is currently doing her PhD in the area of graphene based gas sensors at BITS, Pilani Dubai Campus. Since September 2014, she has been working as a Visiting Graduate Research Assistant in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi. Her research interests include microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and graphene.

Abstract:

Graphene, the two-dimensional carbon allotrope with large specific surface area, has shown to be less sensitive to most of the gases, in its pure form. Doping of graphene with other elements has proved to be very efficient in improving the sensitivity of graphene-based gas sensors. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have reported that O2, NO, NO2 and SO2 are strongly chemisorbed onto phosphorus doped graphene (abbreviated as PG) through the formation of P-X (X = O, N, S) bonds. Similarly, sulphur doped graphene (abbreviated as SG) has shown high selectivity sensing of NO2 compared with NH3, CO, SO2, CH4. Graphene doped with phosphorus and sulphur have been experimentally synthesized. Motivated by the enhanced sensing behavior and successful synthesis of PG and SG, we analyze the suitability of employing them for H2S sensing, which has not been reported earlier. The adsorption property of H2S on PG and SG sheets are theoretically studied using first-principles DFT calculations. We found that in both PG and SG, the dopant atom protrude out of the graphene layer and there is no significant change in their atomic structures after H2S adsorption. The calculations showed weak physisorption of H2S on both SG and PG with small adsorption energies of -0.01 eV and -0.03 eV and large molecule-doping atom distances of around 3.5 Å. The results from the Hirshfeld charge distribution analysis of the structures indicate negligible effect of H2S on the electrical conductance of the doped graphenes. It was observed that the local curvature induced by P and S doping resulting from the bigger size of the dopant than carbon, does not enhance the reactivity of graphene to H2S. The observed weak interactions between doped graphene and H2S indicate that graphene sheets doped with P or S are not suitable for the detection of H2S.

Saba A J Sulaiman

Sultan Qaboos University, Sultanate of Oman

Title: The study of gold nanoparticles coated with human serum albumin as drug carriers

Time : 16:40 – 16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Saba A J Sulaiman has been a Lecturer at the Higher College of Technology in Muscat since 2005. She is now a PhD student at Sultan Qaboos University from 2013 where she studies the spectroscopy and dynamics of protein-ligand interaction.

Abstract:

In recent years, nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated with proteins have received much attention due to their exclusive properties that are size tunable. Special interest is given to the dynamic layer formed between the NP and the proteins based on competitive grounds. This layer is usually formed by the proteins covalently binding or adsorbed on the NP surface. Among the several divisions of proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) is one of the major drug carrier proteins in the blood plasma. We have recently studied the spectroscopy of HSA in physiological conditions using fluorescein (FL) as a probe ligand. The quenching effect of FL on the fluorescence intensity of W214 (the sole tryptophan in HSA) indicates that FL occupies the warfarin drug-binding site in the protein which is known to bind most hydrophobic drugs. This was confirmed by site-competitive displacement experiments using ibuprofen and warfarin as site markers. Upon its association with the NP surface, the intrinsic spectroscopic signatures of HSA tends to change. Therefore, modification of the system was performed by coating selected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the HSA-FL complex. The preliminary results indicate a complex formation in which HSA is adsorbed on the AuNPs surface. This was further confirmed using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Significant quenching of the W214 fluorescence was observed in the HSA-AuNP complex which is attributed to the surface plasmon effect on the protein, thereby, implying an efficient energy transfer from HSA to the AuNPs. The absorbance change of the AuNPs was also quantified as a function of the HSA and FL concentration in order to understand the mechanism of interaction with the NPs. Optimization of the complex formation between the AuNPs and the HSA-FL complex will be discussed in the light of the different spectroscopic signatures in both frequency and time domains.

Speaker
Biography:

Ms. Syeda Juveriya Fathima is working as a research scholar at Defence Food Research Laboratory, India. Ms. Juveriya is doing research on “Development of Vitamin B1 and Vitamin C nanoparticles and their evaluation in vitro and in vivo” for her doctoral studies. She has acquired excellent skills in research methods related to biochemistry. She is considerate, sincere, kind and skilful in interpersonal skills. She has published 2 research articles in reputed journals. Recently published an article entitled "Phosphatidylcholine, an edible carrier for nanoencapsulation of unstable thiamine." in Food Chemistry 197 (2016): 562-570. Ms. Juveriya has written 2 book chapters for Elsevier (Nutrient Delivery).

Abstract:

Vitamin C is an essential micronutrient required in traces in order to maintain skin health, vision and development of skeleton. It acts as an antioxidant thereby reducing the risk of many chronic diseases, also improves immune function and regulates gene expression. The lack of sustainability of vitamin C is due to its susceptibility to high temperature, light and oxygen. Thereby it becomes obligatory to protect this labile ingredient while processing of food and storage. Encapsulation in the form of nanoparticles can prolong the shelf life and target delivery to the desired site; increase retention time. In the present study, chitosan has been used to prepare ascorbic acid nanoparticles by ionotropic gelation method. Ascorbic acid nanoparticles were characterized by measuring particle size, zeta potential (DLS), encapsulation efficiency (90%), thermal behavior (DSC), stability with respect to pH, temperature and time, functional group analysis (FTIR) and morphological (SEM and AFM) analysis. Disintegrating properties; in vitro digestion testing with respect to time at pH range of 1.2-6.8 mimicking gastrointestinal tract was investigated using AFM and HPLC. The effects of nanoparticles on RBC, WBC and platelets were assesed. Chromosomal analysis was performed on phytohemagglutinin stimulated blood lymphocyte cultures treated with the nanoparticles (68 hours). Metaphases were analyzed and karyograms were prepared using standard software. It was found that the vitamin C was successfully encapsulated (size ~100-150nm, zeta potential +50mV) and the nanoparticles formed were highly stable (upto autoclavable temperature i.e 120 oC) and allowed sustained release in small intestinal mimicked environment. No signicant effect was observed on the extent of hemolysis (RBC), membrane integrity (WBC), ADP- induced platelet aggregation and chromosomes. Therefore, nanotechnology can be increasingly applied for fortification of food products with heat and time sensitive vitamins. The technique has great impact and future prospective to protect vitamins during thermal processing and storage of the formulated product and deliver the desired active components to the targeted site of the body.